Billboard featuring U.S. soldier and Muslim woman draws controversy

People are still talking about the provocative ad for SnoreStop, a line of anti-snoring products made by California-based Green Pharmaceuticals, because of its depiction of a U.S. solider with his arm wrapped around a woman wearing a niqab.

This billboard for anti-snoring products has turned heads in Los Angeles, and it is headed to Chicago and New York, too.

A billboard that shows a U.S. soldier embracing a Muslim woman who is wearing a wedding ring has social media buzzing with praise and criticism.

And, believe it or not, it’s an ad for anti-snoring sprays and tablets.

SnoreStop’s provocative billboard is part of its “#betogether” campaign. The ad features the couple, the hashtag and the phrase “Keeping you together,” but does not show the products.

SnoreStop’s #betogether campaign is meant to promote tolerance, a company spokesperson said.

Melody Devemark, SnoreStop’s vice president of communications, told the Daily News that the company’s goal was to promote tolerance along with its brand.

“We recreated couples that do actually exist because we knew they would get people’s attention,” she said. “We want it to be eye-catching but in a cerebral way, so they ask themselves ‘what are they trying to say.'”

SnoreStop, which is made by California-based Green Pharmaceuticals, also released a behind-the-scenes videos of the making of the billboard and the campaign.

Model and active duty soldier Paul Evans poses with model Lexy Panterra in a photo shoot based on a real couple.

Some people have applauded it. A Facebook user who identified himself as a white American male who is married to an Indonesian Muslim said the ad was “brave.”

“In today’s society the mix of races and religions is a fact and those who disagree are who I would call racist. Way to go, breaking the ceiling on your advertising methods,” he wrote on StopSnore’s Facebook page.

However, not everyone liked what they saw.

In a behind-the-scenes video, Evans and Panterra both say they are happy to be part of a campaign that promotes diversity.

“Nothing but a slap in the face to our military members that have been killed for your right to free speech. DISGUSTING!” a woman wrote.

“Muslim suicide bombers killed our troops. My son fought in Afghanistan and was lucky to come home. I will not buy your product,” another posted on the page.

The first campaign billboard went up on Sunset Blvd. in Hollywood on Oct. 28. The ad is also headed for Chicago and New York.